Quick Update for a Plain Built-in Cupboard

A quick project.

This built-in in our dining room has always bugged me with its flat doors that have no detail. Dining room built-in, 1911 house.

The other doors in our house have a simple raised shaker style border, which aren’t so fun to dust, but look nice.

While we were painting the floors it dawned on me that it would be pretty easy to give the doors a quick facelift with some trim. The husband said “sure, it’s a good idea, but it’s certainly not a priority right?” I said “oh right” and then went out the next day and bought some inexpensive molding. He rolled his eyes.

It was pretty easy – it took about 4 hours. This is how we did it:

  • Purchased Trim. We used hemlock lattice molding (.25″ x 2.25″).
  • Removed doors. We unscrewed the doors from the frames.
  • Carefully measured and cut (with a chop saw) trim to fit door.
  • Notched out trim for hinges with X-Acto knife and chisel/hammer.
  • Applied wood glue to the back of the trim, lined it up on the face of the door, and clamped the heck out of it. Protected trim from clamp marks with wood scraps.
  • Let it dry overnight.
  • Filled in any gaps with Elmers Wood Filler.
  • Sanded and eased edges slightly with hand sander.
  • Primed, painted.
  • Re-installed.

Here’s what it looks like now. I also got some new simpler bin pulls and knobs. The husband’s comment was “oh sure, I guess it looks better – but, would you ever paint the entire built-in a color? It kinda looks like primer right now.”

What do you think? Should I paint it a color?

Dining room built-in after, with added shaker style border.

Dining room built-in (after) with added shaker style border.

To see more of Heidi’s artwork, visit her at Old Stuff. New Stories.

From Ugly to Lovely, Painting a Floor, Part 2

An embarrassingly long time ago, we wrote about a project we were working on – painting a fir floor. You can read about it here: From Ugly to Lovely, Painting a Floor, Part 1. (We didn’t realize that it would it be over a year and a half later before we wrote Part 2.)

After many delays (removing an existing wood stove, demolishing a hearth, installing new wood stove and hearth, patching various areas of the floor where there were old heat registers) it’s done! Well, the living room is done. The dining room isn’t quite done, but we are so excited by the results, we wanted to share some photos.

As a reminder, this is what the floor looked like before:

Floor_Before1

And here’s what it looks like now:

FloorFinished!

This is how we got there:

Because the floor was painted with lead paint, we didn’t want to sand it, so we used “Krud Kutter”. (Why do companies think it’s a good idea to use weirdly spelled names – what’s wrong with Crud Cutter?) This cleaned the surface and reduced the glossy finish and created a “tooth” for the paint to stick to.

Then we primed the surface using XIM UMA, a special primer/bonder. I’ve used this product in the past and have had great luck. It is designed for difficult to paint non-porous surfaces.

After allowing the primer to dry, we painted the floor. We used 2 coats of Pratt & Lambert’s WithStand floor paint in a special color mix of a dark charcoal gray, allowing 24 hours to dry in between coats.

The final floor:

FloorFinished2

The paint needs to cure for 7 days before placing any furniture or rugs. So meantime, this is what the dining room looks like:

DiningRoom_During

Yikes. I especially like the murderer’s glove in the foreground.

To see more of Heidi’s artwork, visit her at Old Stuff. New Stories.

Vintage Railroad Crossing Sign

I’ve always coveted those big old Railroad Crossing signs. I’ve seen them at a couple antique stores here in Seattle, but they’ve always been super expensive. We were in Door County, Wisconsin, by Sturgeon Bay this summer for our annual family trip and I stopped by one of my favorite antique stores there – Richard’s Antiques. I wanted to back a truck up to the store and take everything with me, but settled on 2 sets of railroad signs (and some other things too numerous to mention here).

RailRoadCrossing

RailRoadCrossing_detail

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Staircase from Iron and Salvaged Wood

The other day someone wrote in and asked about the staircase that is shown in one of our posts about re-using old doors in a remodel. I realized that we had never posted about the stairs – mostly because they were completed before we ever started blogging. I don’t have any pictures of the process, but for those of you interested, here are some photos/details of the final staircase: 

stair railing design, custom stair railing, metal and wood staircase, modern stair

The design came from our desire of wanting a mix of traditional Craftsman (like our downstairs) and a slightly contemporary look (like our upstairs).

The husband painstakingly built the staircase, using planed/salvaged Douglas Fir (when possible). We had a local metal fabricator, Atomic Fabricators, build the iron work, and provided them with plywood templates so the measurements and angles fit perfectly. We attached the iron to the wood with galvanized lag bolts.

The project took awhile and it was certainly challenging. In the middle of the process I would often catch the husband just gazing off into the distance in a trance-like state holding a tape measure.

One drawback: the fir treads are a little soft and we’ve learned the hard way that it isn’t a good idea to let your kids wear soccer cleats in the house.

stair railing design, custom stair railing, metal and wood staircase, modern stair

stair railing design, custom stair railing, metal and wood staircase, modern stair

 

To see more of Heidi’s artwork, visit her at Old Stuff. New Stories.

 

 

Craftsman Trim Installation

A while ago, we stripped/prepped some wood for our Craftsman trim. I was afraid it was going to take a while to get it installed, but we had a spurt of energy and got it done! We matched the trim style of the rest of the main floor, read more about that here.

Finished Office Trim:

Office_after

Finished Craftsman style trim, matching the original trim style of our 1911 bungalow. Salvaged Fir doors from RE-Store.

OfficeDoor_final

Finished trim on the office door, opening was added during the remodel. Salvaged divided light hinged door from Second Use Building Materials.

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Not Your Typical Organ Donation

One of our church friends called the other day, saying she just couldn’t bear to toss the last bits of the church organ they were replacing, and might we be interested in taking a look? How could we resist – (husbands roll eyes here, but they never read our posts so we’re safe ;)) We do confess though, (get it, church pun fun), we’re a little stumped as to what to do next…

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This Plus That Equals: Industrial Coffee Table

We found these HUGE casters at Second Use (where else?) and immediately thought “coffee table”. (Actually what I immediately thought was that the husband would kill me if I brought home another big metal piece of randomness – like this and this and this.)

RedCasters_Before

8″ diameter industrial casters.

Plus

WoodPlanks

Planks from RE-Store, planed.

Plus

GasolineCan

Old Gas Can from Habitat for Humanity.

Equals_reverseRedCasterCoffeeTable_after

See more of Heidi’s artwork at Old Stuff. New Stories.

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