Pendant Light With Pulley

My sister hinted that she wanted me to make her a pendant light using a pulley she found. Actually it wasn’t a hint so much as a demand. My sister isn’t known for her subtlety. She also doesn’t read this blog, so I’m safe. :)

I’ve had the pulley for quite some time and I just now finished in time for her birthday.

diy light, how to make a light fixture, interior design, salvage design, up cycle, green design

The parts:

I found the bracket on Etsy, from a cool shop based in Wisconsin (Gizmo and Hoo Ha) with all sorts of vintage odds and ends. It was listed as a holder for horse bridles and tack, which is special because my sister used to be a big horse-back rider.

The lamp parts (wire, socket, plug, cage) I bought online through Sundial Wire. A big plug for them here (pun intended) – not only do they have very nice lamp parts, they also give very detailed instructions on how to wire a plug and socket.

(Side note: Unfortunately, I lost the photos I took of the individual parts before I put the lamp together. My memory card went kaput after I took the pictures and could not be recognized by the computer or the camera. The good news is the store exchanged the damaged card for a new card, but the bad news is all the photos were lost. Has this ever happened to you?)

Happy Birthday to my sister!

To see more of Heidi’s artwork, visit her at Old Stuff. New Stories.

 

 

Quick Update for a Plain Built-in Cupboard

A quick project.

This built-in in our dining room has always bugged me with its flat doors that have no detail. Dining room built-in, 1911 house.

The other doors in our house have a simple raised shaker style border, which aren’t so fun to dust, but look nice.

While we were painting the floors it dawned on me that it would be pretty easy to give the doors a quick facelift with some trim. The husband said “sure, it’s a good idea, but it’s certainly not a priority right?” I said “oh right” and then went out the next day and bought some inexpensive molding. He rolled his eyes.

It was pretty easy – it took about 4 hours. This is how we did it:

  • Purchased Trim. We used hemlock lattice molding (.25″ x 2.25″).
  • Removed doors. We unscrewed the doors from the frames.
  • Carefully measured and cut (with a chop saw) trim to fit door.
  • Notched out trim for hinges with X-Acto knife and chisel/hammer.
  • Applied wood glue to the back of the trim, lined it up on the face of the door, and clamped the heck out of it. Protected trim from clamp marks with wood scraps.
  • Let it dry overnight.
  • Filled in any gaps with Elmers Wood Filler.
  • Sanded and eased edges slightly with hand sander.
  • Primed, painted.
  • Re-installed.

Here’s what it looks like now. I also got some new simpler bin pulls and knobs. The husband’s comment was “oh sure, I guess it looks better – but, would you ever paint the entire built-in a color? It kinda looks like primer right now.”

What do you think? Should I paint it a color?

Dining room built-in after, with added shaker style border.

Dining room built-in (after) with added shaker style border.

To see more of Heidi’s artwork, visit her at Old Stuff. New Stories.

Mod Podge the Chicken Coop – or How to Keep The Hens Happy

This post originally appeared at Mod Podge Rocks Blog. Check it out for more great crafting ideas.

exterior mod podge, chicken coop

Poopsie Lulu was upset. Her coop was looking shabby and in dire need of an update. It was High Time for a bit of love and attention.

Poopsie-at-the-Door-615x409She gave me a stern look.

Poopsie-Looking-Stern-615x528Yikes! I have a blog to write, Poops, (Hammer Like A Girl) – I am so sorry I don’t have time for this right now! You are a talented girl though – I bet you could tackle this on your own. (Time honored parenting advice) I directed her to Google for a few ideas.

Poopsie and “The Google”

Google-Chicken-Coops-2Whoa!! Dial it back a bit, girlfriend, how about we start with some Mod Podge . . .

So Poopsie and her coop-mate, Princess, did a bit more research and with a stroke of  cLuck they discovered the site, AllPosters, with a fine selection of poultry art! And cheep! Very eggcited, they set to work.

First they organized – gathering:

  • Paint brushes for Mod Podge, 1″- 3″ widths (which can be cleaned and re-used)
  • A pencil for marking where to apply the glue and paint
  • Mod Podge Outdoor
  • Mod Podge Antique Matte
  • A stiff squeegee/hand burnisher
  • Black paint, exterior
  • A small paintbrush for thin black lines
  • A wet rag to wiping off mistakes

Next, the girls cleaned and painted the offending front door.

BEFORE

Chicken-Coop-Door-Before-e1411414972265

AFTER

exterior mod podge, chicken coop Examining the poster they had purchased and realizing they were not happy with the overly pristine look of the print, they decided to experiment with aging it a bit by applying one coat of Mod Podge Antique Matte finish. These girls have discerning taste. After a 15 minute drying time it had just the right patina.

Holding the poster against the door, an outline was gently traced in pencil and filled in with Outdoor Mod Podge.

Modpodging-the-doorWorking quickly – especially for hens – they brushed the Outdoor Mod Podge onto the back side of their poster and applied it to the (still wet) door.

Modpodge-the-backThey carefully smoothed the poster onto the door with the squeegee/hand burnisher.

Modpodge-squeegeeNow those ever-clever hens decided to solve the problem of “glue creep” – glue creeping outside the edge of the poster and onto the door – by painting a border around the edge and about 1/2″ out. They also painted the distracting white edge of the poster. In this way the potential shine of the glue seems intentional. Free-handing the black paint gave the piece a more hand-made appeal

Paint-the-poster-edgeThe final four thin coats were applied the same day, allowing a 20 minute drying time for each coat. These layers were painted on all the way to the outside black line, insuring a good seal of the poster edges.

Thin-layers-of-exterior-modpodge-e1411358958596Well done my eggceptional girls! I knew you could do it!

Modpodge-Poster-FinishedHere’s Princess – she wants to share a joke with you.

Two ducks were sitting in a pond and the first one says, “QUACK!”, and the second one says, “That’s funny, that’s what I was gonna say!”

Princess
We love silly jokes and mod podge projects – send us something!

 

DIY Halloween Tombstones!

IMG_3014

Here’s what my son ( and his amazing assistants, mom and dad ) have been up to most of the month of October. Tombstones. Realistic, detailed and creepy Halloween decorations. Check it out:

DIY Halloween decoration, DIY Halloween gravestone, Halloween cemetery

My initial plan was to write a “how to” post with these – but it’s so complicated and detailed that I think a simple slide show is far more fun, so here you go:

Add a little moss from Home Depot and a couple crows from Display and Costume   and you are all done!

DIY Halloween decorations, Halloween decor, How to make Halloween  tombstones

Happy Halloween from all of us at Hammer Like A Girl :)

More Functional Art

I’ve been working on some more functional art for Matter Gallery in Olympia. It was fun working on the pieces and a little hard to hand them off  – like saying good-bye to your children. Check out their shop either online or in person, Olympia is full of interesting places to visit!

You can see more functional art here.

To see more of Heidi’s artwork, visit her at Old Stuff. New Stories.

Two of Our Favorite & Quick Painting Hacks!

Exterior WindowsWe make a lot of mistakes when painting, so we have a couple quick ways to fix them.

The first is to simply wipe them off with a wet rag we carry in our canvas work apron. You may end up wiping off paint from the surface where you actually wanted it, but that’s OK, just paint again – and sometimes you will need to wipe fairly hard to remove it ( depending on how long you waited to address it. Our advice – do it right away.)

The second is a tip from the handy husband. He used to paint houses in the summer to save money for college. You simply wrap your wet rag around a small putty knife. This allows you to clean up tight corners and other hard to navigate areas.

How easy is that! Happy painting :)

PS – Daly’s Paint, has a gift for signing up for their e-newsletter; a free pint of C2 paint each month. We just picked up Tangerine! Sign up for the Color Club here.

Share your hot painting tip with us – if we receive enough we can write a post with them and will be sure to give you credit!

Our List of Tools for Painting Projects

We paint a lot over here at Hammer Like A Girl – cabinets, kid’s rooms, tile, floors. We thought we would share a few good tools that make our lives a little easier, the job a tiny bit better – plus might eliminate a few trips to the basement for just one more thing ;)

So.

First.  No injuries.

Please Direct Your Attention to the Safety Talk:

  • Be sure the ladder is stable and don’t reach beyond a comfortable distance ( this means you, Heidi! )
  • If working outside –grab the sunscreen and a water bottle
  • Wear shoes that won’t slip or catch on things
  • Protect areas with drop cloths or newspaper
  • We love our 3rd Hand Paint Pail. Holds the paintbrush and is far easier to use than a paint can. ( And made in the USA )
  • Buy a good pair of groovy protection goggles if you need them (when scraping and sanding)

Safety Glasses

Now onto –

Our Favorite Tools For Painting:

Painting Tools Unpacked

Here’s a List of Miscellaneous Things we Find Useful:

  • Reading glasses
  • Headlamp
  • Sandpaper of 180 and 220 grit ( usually smallish pieces )
  • Sanding block for larger flat areas
  • Gloves
  • A 1″/25mm and a 2″/50mm paint brush, nylon/polyester blend, angled
  • 2-3 small art brushes for hard to reach areas ( not fancy )
  • Pencils for drawing on the walls ( so you can see where to paint )
  • Pencil sharpener
  • Blue tape
  • Paint can opener
  • Stir sticks
  • Smallish paint containers: yogurt tubs or a 3rd Hand Paint Pail
  • A canvas work apron or small tool belt (so helpful!)
  • Putty knife for scraping
  • Needle nose pliers for pulling out cracked/worn caulk
  • A narrow screwdriver for loose screws and digging out yuck
  • A nail punch for popped nails
  • A small hammer for the same and sealing paint lids closed
  • Toothbrush for brushing debris from corners
  • A razor blade for cleaning up past mistakes etc
  • Wet cloths for cleaning dirt off paint
  • Wet cloths for wiping off spills and mistakes
  • More drop cloths & rags
  • This list, so we can double-check that nothing has been pilfered or lost –

That’s a lot of stuff! We finally decided to start storing them together in a caddy. When we are painting we carry them in our small tool belts.

Painting Tools in Caddy

Oh – and one more thing. Because Chocolate.

Theo Chocolate

Do you have any favorite painting tools? We would love to hear your tips!