This Plus That Equals: a Side Table

This is the first post in a new category where we show little photo collections of some of our projects. The intent is less “tutorial” and more “look at things differently, you never know what can go together to make something new and one of a kind”. Enjoy and please let us know what you think! We love feedback.

SteamTable_before

Steam table, on its way to the scrap metal yard. Stripping it of its silver paint revealed iron legs and galvanized body/shelf. Removing the screwed-on top revealed a solid copper lining (like a silver lining only better).

Plus

ReclaimedWood_before

Old Douglas Fir lumber from Second Use Building Material.

Plus

Hinge_before

Old set of hinges, from a gate we removed in our backyard.

Equals_reverse

SteamTable_final2

Finished side table with hinged plank top for access to storage.

See more of Heidi’s artwork at Old Stuff. New Stories.

8 thoughts on “This Plus That Equals: a Side Table

  1. I was wondering, “who was Stanley Doucette’. According to this site, it’s Long Beach California
    http://losangeles.blockshopper.com/property/7269007020/121_w_15th/
    I couldn’t find anything else though.

    I don’t know how you have a vision for something. It really surprises me what comes out of something I wouldn’t give a 2nd look to. I really think the hinged top was an awesome design. Reminds me of those old school desks. Did you sand and oil the old Douglas Fir boards? I always like to hear about the products that work for you. Looks great!

    • I tried to look for some info on Stanley Doucette too – I think I googled Stanley Doucette sheet metal fabricator or some such thing. It is always so interesting to find out some background on the different pieces.

      Thanks for your comments, you are so nice. I guess I look for nice lines, cool materials and good quality construction, even if it might be hiding under yucky paint or in an industrial part of the salvage yard. A lot of the time the piece is incomplete as it is, so I try to think of a complimentary material (usually wood with metal). I think the one important thing is not to fix it up too much, so it doesn’t lose its original character.

      You are right, we did sand the Doug Fir (starting at 80 grit, then working my way up to 220), and finished it with Daly’s Profin – 3 coats.

      The husband’s first reaction when he saw it done was “oh, so the hinges are going to be on the top?” That was a little annoying, so it makes me happy that you like the hinges! Husbands. argh.

      • Thanks for the product info and yep, our guys have a way don’t they? I always know when Mr B doesn’t like something I’ve made for dinner.
        Him, “did you make something new?”
        Me, “not your thing?”
        Him, “I like your (other thing) better”.
        Me, “argh”.
        LOL

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *