Chateau de Mores, Medora, North Dakota

On our road trip this summer we drove through Medora, located in the Badlands of western North Dakota in Theodore Roosevelt National Park. It is a rugged but beautiful area. We stopped and visited the historic site of the Chateau de Mores.

Chateau de Mores in Medora, ND, built in just 3 months in 1883.

Chateau de Mores in Medora, ND, built in just 3 months in 1883.

The Marquis de Mores was a French nobleman who came to N.D. in the late 1800’s to start a meat-packing business. He and his wife (Medora) were avid hunters and riders and he had this large house built for her. It was simple by their standards, but to the people of the area the house was grand, and they nicknamed it the “Chateau”. The family stayed for about 3 years – the business was not successful, but the house remains as a historical site. You can learn more here.

We took a tour through the house – it is beautifully maintained and has many of the original belongings of the family. The guides were knowledgeable and shared interesting details about the societal details/protocol of that era. Everywhere you looked were beautiful vignettes of another time. My favorite was a mounted Bison head trophy on a wall that was covered with floral wallpaper. Perfect juxtaposition of western wildness and eastern refinement!

Medora, wife of Marquis de Mores, with her three children.

Medora, wife of Marquis de Mores, with her three children.

Basin, pitcher, and towel, Chateau de Mores

Basin, pitcher, and towel, Chateau de Mores

Receipts and bills of goods, Chateau de Mores

Receipts and bills of goods, Chateau de Mores

I forgot to slip a watermark copyright on my images. As always you’ll need to contact to us to use or repost any of our images.

See more of Heidi’s artwork at Old Stuff. New Stories.

3 thoughts on “Chateau de Mores, Medora, North Dakota

  1. Oh, I really enjoy looking thru historical family homes. We did a tour of Monticello when we were in Virginia. Lots of fun. Except for the animal trophies, I’d love looking at all their treasures. I realize it was a different time, and people hunted to have meat on the table. I’m a vegetarian and probably would have perished from malnutrition in the day. Maybe I’d just drink more wine with dinner, LOL. I’m sure fresh produce was a summer thing and meat and potatoes and carrots, a winter thing. They probably had anything they canned like tomatoes, pickles, fruit. Was the house electrified back then or gas lamp? I really like their library on wheels. Thanks for the tour. Awesome photo’s

    • I know what you mean about the animal trophies – a little creepy, but they just looked so right in that house. I’m pretty sure there was no electricity – upstairs the oil lanterns that were mounted on the wall had a reflective disk behind them to reflect more light – pretty ingenious. I liked the library too – maybe there is a way to make one – it is cool because you don’t need wall space. I guess I will pass on the Bison head though. One thing I thought was odd that the tour guides said is the the Marquis had an indoor toilet (a wooden box with a lid), but the Marquess had to use a chamber pot. Not fair.

      I’ve never been to Monticello, but the husband was there this past year and was surprised at how small it was. Did you think that too?

      • Eeeeww, unlucky was the person who was on chamber pot duty :0/

        I thought the same thing about Monticello, it does always look so much bigger in photo’s. A lot of fun technology, like the way Jefferson made a copy of his letters was with a dual pen apparatus. I guess he wasn’t a very big guy. His bed was pretty small.

        You probably totally could make a portable library. Looks like the bottom of an office chair might work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *